Category: Sustainable Environment

“Energy Sprawl”

That’s the title of a feature article in Nature Conservancy magazine’s Fall issue. What really drew my attention to the article is the Land Use vs. Carbon Footprint graphic shown here.  Good info, easy to take in. And, something I hadn’t really

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Worried about Air Pollution? Look Inside.

The average American spends so much time indoors. Rather too bad, but that’s the reality for most of us. With the onset of winter, it’s gonna be truer. Catching my attention lately was the quote: “According to the [EPA], the

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Sea Level Rise and Some of Our Most Important Monuments

About a month ago, Rolling Stone Magazine published: “What Happens When a Superstorm Hits D.C.?” Its lead image- Another image shown in the article is of a section of flood wall along 17th St. in D.C. that must be manually

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What’s a Tree Pit? An Opportunity, I Submit.

For nearly 9 months of this year, I and some others have been engaged in an effort to reduce impervious surfacing at my very urban Baltimore City church. As the church has no vacant land and city regulations prohibit removing

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Ode to summer, moving towards fall

Before moving on to today’s intended post, consider acting on Administration moves to shrink Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments. These efforts are urged by extraction industries which rarely restore what they’ve disrupted. They can get theirs from elsewhere. The

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National Monument/Parks – Some Good/Bad News

Some Good News Sand to Snow National Monument recently deemed “safe”. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has just recommended no changes be made to the monument’s protected status. Whew! One down. 20 national monuments to go, including Giant Sequoia and Vermillion

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Giants of Sustainability – Sequoias

Most of you have Bucket Lists, I assume? On mine was a visit and numerous hikes in Yosemite National Park. And, to see what’s called the largest (most massive) living tree on earth. By trunk volume–no branches. That’d be the

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A Magnificent, Suitably Scaled Historic Hotel in Yosemite

Yosemite National Park was formed in 1890. Who signed the first legislation that protected key parts of the park? President Abe Lincoln. In 1864 he gave the Yo-semite Valley and the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias to the state of

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An Urban Oasis – in Portland’s Pearl District

What a delight was in store for us when finding Tanner Springs Park in downtown Portland’s Pearl District several weeks ago! This 1-acre urban park, occupying a city block, was created back in 2010 by a team of landscape architects

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We’ve Got a Problem… (?)

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